Eastertide – Minds Opened

Searching His Word
 Seeking His Heart

Last week, we remembered the great rejoicing that the two from Emmaus felt when they realized they had been with the risen Lord. (“Eastertide – Burning Hearts“) They hastened back to Jerusalem to share the good news with the disciples.

. . . the two told . . .  how Jesus was recognized by them when he broke the bread. While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” They were startled and frightened, thinking they saw a ghost. Luke 24:35-37

The disciples have heard the good news from the women, from Mary Magdalene, from Cleopas and his companion, and now they have seen Jesus himself, but they think he’s a ghost!

Jesus questions why they are troubled and have doubts. He asks for food and eats it so they can see he’s not a ghost, for goodness sake. Then we’re told they feel joy and amazement, but there still seems to be some doubt. 

Truth be told, we can have those moments when something is so wonderful, you still have trouble believing it has come true.

Jesus reminds them that—

“Everything must be fulfilled that is written about me in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the Psalms.” Luke 24:44

Hint, hint. In other words, all of the Torah plus the other writings. He reminded them anew,

“The Christ must suffer and rise from the dead on the third day.” Luke 24:46

Ah yes, that again. Finally, their minds are opened. Not only that—

“. . . repentance and forgiveness of sin will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. You will be witnesses of these things.” Luke 24:46-48

Finally, through the Scripture and Jesus’ own words, the path is laid out for them.

That’s how it was for me that year that I participated in a study of the book of Matthew. I kept meditating on Jesus’ words, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear. He who has eyes to see, let him see.”

As I continued the study, I became aware of lesser-known characters along the way, wondering what might be the rest of their stories. I began to entertain the idea of writing such a story.

Then, at the arrest of Jesus, I felt drawn to the character Malchus, servant of the high priest. Peter had sliced off his ear there in the garden. Jesus bent down and healed his ear. What was the rest of Malchus’ story? How did that healing affect him? He who has ears to hear, let him hear. I finally found the “what” I had been looking for. (Last week’s blog)

It took a few years, but I finally did my small part in fulfilling a plan to “preach repentance and forgiveness in his name.”

What part, small or dramatic, does he have for you?

~ Joyce ~

 

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